Community Page

Welcome to our page for those interested in walking and in developing this resource for walk lovers. For more information on Walkopedia go to our about us page.

To give feedback or ideas, or otherwise participate in the Walkopedia project click here.

Recent Developments

October 2017: walking in amazing Madeira.

A form of walking heaven. High knife-edges to extraordinary "levada" irrigation channels. Lots of walks to be posted!


August 2017: just back from walking in gorgeous western Kerry, Ireland.

What an area. Best walk was Carrauntoohil, Ireland's highest mountain and possessor of thrillingly beautiful views of mountains, crags, ridges, lakes and the shimmering pewter sea. Lots to follow.


March 2017: Big moment - our 1,000th walk is loaded...

.....and it is, fittingly, the magnificent Jebel Akhdar in Oman.


Christopher Somerville's talk at the Chipping Norton Literary Festival
We are proud to be sponsoring Christopher Somerville's talk at the Chipping Norton Literary Festival on his book The January Man. Sunday 30 April, 2017.

“The January Man is the story of a year of walks. Month by month, season by season and region by region, Christopher Somerville walks the British Isles, following routes that continually bring his father to mind.” https://www.chiplitfest.com/events/the-january-man


January 2017: 740,000 page views in 2016!

Questions for You


We have been told that it is not currently possible to walk the full Cinque Terre route due to landslides, but this is not mentioned much on the internet. Does anyone have any more information?
Posted on: 17/06/2013
Coops answer:
We were in the Cinque Terre on 12&13 August 2013. Due to landslides it was not possible to walk from Riomaggiore (town 1) all the way to Corniglia (town 3). Walking was only allowed from Corniglia through Vernazza to Monterosso (town 5). This section was awesome, but it was quite disappointing not to be able to walk the whole way. THANK YOU!
Johnnywalker answer:
Was there in september 2013 and it was still not possible to walk the section affected by the landslides but an alternative route, a little higher was possible. It is even possible to walk all the way to the ridge, cross over the affected area, and then descend to the coast. Another option is to extend the walk from Riomaggiore to Porto Venere in the south. That adds some great views of the coastline. Goods boots are necessary though.
Charity walks: we are planning to have a focus on good charity walks (it will take a while to change the site)... in the meantime let us know of great upcoming walks around the world - the longer the notice, the better!
Posted on: 14/07/2009
nick warlow answer:
I can tell you about a walk I did for charity last year with my wife. We walked from York to Rome in 5 months. We've got loads of photos I can forward and have written a book about the adventure.
What is your favourite walk, and why? How would it rate using our system?
Posted on: 01/05/2008

Your Thoughts and Feedback

Gerry - Posted on: 27/08/2017

Why are there no walks listed in Germany? I'm particularly interested in southern Germany, like their Bavarian alps and the black forest area Baden-Baden-Württemberg.

Walkopedia says: very fair point! We love germany, at it is some pockets of Walking Heaven. Germany is high on the to research list, but still below Canada. We'll get there!

DiBatten - Posted on: 27/06/2017

I have only recently discovered your site and I am finding it very interesting. I have not found any explanation of the "Level of Difficulty" ratings. I notice that a variety of descriptive terms are used; strenuous, very difficult, difficult, moderate and straightforward are ones that I have noticed, and I am thinking that they probably would be in descending order of challenge as I have listed them. It would be helpful to have this clarified though, particularly for those for whom English is not a first language. The terminology is a bit reminiscent of the ancient British grading system which was replaced by an open-ended system because they kept needing words that implied greater difficulty and there was so much dispute about the relative contribution of technical difficulty, risk and strenuosity. Obviously there are heaps of problems with all grading systems but it could help to have yours explained in the way you have explained the overall walks rating system. Keep up your excellent work.

Walkopedia says: MOST helpful, many thanks. We'll work to add a detailed explanation, but in descending order it is: very difficult - eg because of altitude, huge climbs/descents/distances, climbing/gut-wrenching via ferratas, every day; difficult - similar but not as bad, dut still tough and demanding; Strenuous, hard work and you'll be tired by the day end, but not "difficult" (eg a proper Munro or Lake District mountain.  Moderate - a reasonable walk that reasonably fit people will feel exercised by but not exhausted. Straightforward, as it sounds. All these assume a reasonably fit and experienced walker. If very unfit or inexperienced, it will be harder!  

Rob - Posted on: 17/03/2017

Hello, I've been enjoying reading your site as I am planning a trip to the Lake District in September. As I looked, I browsed what you had to say about Canada, and notice that things were fairly thin. A couple of points: First, Quebec is a "province" not a "state" (although there may be politics in calling it a "state" since there has been an active independence movement there). Second, you would do well to consider some of the best walking in Canada on the Bruce Trail http://brucetrail.org The Bruce is a wonderful, long trail that crosses through Ontario (the second largest province) from Niagara Falls in the south to the tip of the Bruce Peninsula. It is a continuous trail. Occasionally, intrepid hikers will take on the whole thing, but accomplishing any one of its sections is a multi-day affair. As a lifelong Ontario resident, let me speak of the splendours of the trail. It is not as spectacular as mountain or Lake District hikes. Much of it traverses woodland and then works its way along the edges of farmers fields in the midsection. The two ends are generally the more spectacular parts of the trail. The top end, on the Bruce peninsula (particularly north of Wiarton, Ontario) is rugged but offers the best spectacle in terms of lake vistas across Georgian Bay, and geological formations in terms of the cliffs and caves that make up the top of the Bruce. Another lovely part of the trail is actually near the industrial city of Hamilton, where the trail winds its way past many waterfalls. The other excellent feature of the south end of the trail is its proximity to a world-class wine country. Best hiking on the trails is from mid-April through to early July (although black flies can be bad in mid-May in the north end), or September and October. Early October offers the best fall colour as the forests are largely carolinian, rich with maple, beech, birch, and oak. I hope this helps bring in an area I noticed neglected in your discussion of Canada. Best, Rob Irish

Walkopedia says: thank you so much for this very valuable input, Rob. We'll prioritise the Bruce Trail! Enjoy the Lake District!

Emma - Posted on: 26/10/2016
Hi All, I'm new to this website and am looking to take a six week walk anywhere in the world in Feb/March/April next year as part of a sabbatical. Ideally somewhere not too cold! Are there any recommendations out there of trails to follow and where to go? Thank you! Emma

Hi Emma - you didn't give us your mail, so can't respond directly. Please email us and we can give some ideas! good luck. Walkopedia
phil - Posted on: 25/09/2016
I am new to this site and will have contributions to make once I have had a good look round it. Are there any plans to have downloadable GPX tracks of the walks? Thanks Phil

Walko says: Hi Phil, good to hear from you and we look forward to your ideas! Mapping is a really difficult one for us, for various reasons. We have plans for adding both broad location maps and detailed GPX maps or the like. It is a question of getting the manpower onto it!
brenno - Posted on: 09/02/2016
To my consternation have only just discovered walkopedia - what have I missed all these years. Coming from Ireland surprised that there are only six walks listed - three in the Republic and three in Northern Ireland, but will try and rectify that situation in weeks and months ahead. Seriously though we have any number of fantastic walks of various grades - and the Reeks Ridge walk in Kerry would rank in anybody's top 100. There is also a wonderful walking community website - mountainviews.ie - with all sorts of detail and walks

Walkopedia says thanks Brenno!!
dellis - Posted on: 02/01/2016
Your comment about "needlessly assert “western” ways of behaving, thinking and doing things." is quite offensive. It singles out a particular group of persons based on a generic identity of hailing from a "western" country. This is a completely false and negative pronouncement on a particular culture, when there are what you might label "eastern" or "southern" cultural identities that could be as disruptive to other areas that identify differently. By singling out this segment of society you are promoting the stigma and fueling a hate-based position against other thoughts and beliefs. Had you chosen a more generic undertaking of promoting responsible and considerate travel many would feel less offended by these judgmental beliefs.

Walkopedia says: sorry, but this is dreary, narrow and wrong-headed: if you had your way, no-one would ever say anything about anything. God help the survival of humorous or lighthearted writing. A hastening of the heralded "closing of the Western mind"?? 
nigelarmi - Posted on: 17/10/2015
I want to let you know about my website: Trails Less Trodden which you can find at www.trailslesstrodden.uk It covers unfrequented but worthwhile trails in the UK, Ireland, Iceland, the Faroe Islands and Norway, areas not well represented on your website. The introduction to the website explains what it is all about so I won't repeat myself here. Please take a look as I think you will find much to interest you. I even choose my 15 best hikes, which are all exceptional and should interest you (you can find them at the end of the 'Odds & Sods' section. You are welcome to use any of my material but please acknowledge by quoting my website.

Walkopedia says: lovely site!!
Kate Clow - Posted on: 15/06/2015
Hi William, your website has grown beyond imagination. Congrats. But for all latest info on Turkey's routes : www.cultureroutesinturkey.com is the new website. It now has all the 19 'official' routes in Turkey on it. And for books about Turkish routes (and maps) www.trekkinginturkey.com. www.lycianway.com is no longer our main site and hasn't been for many years!!!! If you would like stories, maps or anything else about the routes, pls let us know. . all best Kate

Walkopedia says (to the brilliant Kate Clow, creator of the Lycian Way and other walks): will do, what you have done for walking in Turkey is amazing.
Peter1947 - Posted on: 29/03/2015
I love your website!! And I pass it on to my friends who love walking. Here's my point. I am trying to think of a way of walking Torres des Pines - and it would be extremely useful to know how I get there! Seriously, if your pages could give insight how to get to the different walks - especially the more out-of-the-way ones that would be great!!! I know you have links to tour operators, but I i would like to know how to get to the nearest city/town and then who to contact to lead a walk - that would be ae some! Cheers Peter

Walkopedia says: thank you, useful to know people care about this aspect - we do try to give this information, and will try harder!
n2311 - Posted on: 04/09/2014
I think it would be useful if it was possible to download *.pdf files to give information on walks
dreamexec - Posted on: 21/07/2014
Hi, I stumbled open Walkopedia a few days ago and it has inspired me walk The World's 100 Best Walks. I am considering visiting Fiji in September and would like to attempt the Fiji Mountain Walk. I understand that the page for this walk is at an early stage of development however I was wondering if you could be so kind to point me in the right direction and send me any details about this walk that you have. I have struggled to find any good information online regarding the route. I have recently bought a GoPro and I plan to document and record each and every walk I do. I'd love to share my experiences with you and if there's anything that I can do to help I'd love to get more involved in what you are doing. Thanks in advance and I hope we can connect, Mike dreamexec.com

Walkopedia says:

Hi, Mike

Great to hear from you, and thank you for your kind words.  

We don't have much info here as yet, and am chasing one of my helpers, who some time ago started work researching the Fiji  (but then went and got a proper job....) to see where if anywhere she got to.  I don't think this is a hard walk (a day walk max, so can be fixed up when there, which is what my helper did), but looks lovely. I am going to add a couple of photos to the site shortly.

Fantastic about tackling the Top 100. And we wd love you to get involved. Do send us all accounts, ideas and photos you have. We might publish some in our magazine where appropriate. (A word of warning re the Top 100 - I am finding to my cost that I keep discovering new great walks that merit top 100 ranking, so the proportion I have done (something like 45%) is SHRINKING!!!!)





EuropeanDayHiker - Posted on: 11/04/2014
I'm catching a train from Toulouse France through the Pyrenees in mid may and I wanted to stop and do a spring hike. Your Pyrenees page mentions the "Aruge Valley" (which I can't find anywhere, and assume to be the Ariege area which I will be right next to), as a page you're working on, and I was wondering if you've come up with any favorite day hikes in the area accessible without an Iceaxe? Though google maps has imaging data from 2014 showing some rather suprising areas totally snow free in this warm winter, I know how finicky mountain weather can be. If you've got anything good I can send you pictures in return for the help. Thanks
Walkopedia says: we're afraid you didn't give us your email, so we can't reply directly - hope you get this. Try the many gorgeous walks in Cathar country, especially the Sentier Cathare. Higher walks: depends on where you will be passing through. Ax Les Thermes and higher in the Ariege valley are great bases for fine walking. 
Johnnywalker - Posted on: 30/12/2013
This website offers great inspiration for walking and traveling! Everytime I come to visit here I want to start walking any other trail....

I have a question. Is there a reason that you recommend no walks at all in Germany? I would be interested in knowing whether you have found the Westweg worthwhile...
Walkopedia says: thank you. We love Germany, and plan to focus on it as a country (we are still developing!). We have not had many recommendations, which is partly why we have been slow. Will look into the Westweg.
cambista - Posted on: 17/10/2013
Hi Looking forward to walking pat of the Bibbulmin trail in Western Australia which I got to know well when I lived in Perth in the 1980s. All things change -but one of its jewels was the circular walk from Pemberton through 70kms or so of prime karri forest known as the Warren circuit. I walked this circuit in 1983 -and again in 1993. I am hoping to do it again in November but there is no mention of circuit trails on-line. If it has been de-listed and signage has been removed -it may not be possible. What a pity. Circular walks (and there were only 3 on the Bibbulmin in its earlier days) are so useful if you just have one car and don't want to be confined to 'there and back' day-walks. Maybe someone knows what the current situation is?
Gavin - Posted on: 10/10/2013
Is there a database of the walks in the world that would take over a month to complete? I know about the El Camino, the Appalaichan trail, the Pacific Crest Rim... I am looking for something in Europe or South America preferably. Any suggestions would be great! Thanks!

Walkopedia says: How abt Lycian Way or St Paul Trail in Turkey, Chenin St Jacques (French part of Camino), Pyreneean High Route or GR10 in French Pyreness or GR11 in Spanish, Via Francigena in Italy, Alta Via 2 in Italian Alps/Dolomites, Kungsleden in Sweden, Continental Divide in USA, Snowman Trek in Bhutan or Kangchenjunga Base camp in Nepal? No single trails of that length immediately spring to mind in South America.

Bill Peel - Posted on: 24/06/2013
Brilliant site! Wow! Its all here. Finally something to really get your teeth into. The photos the ratings the descriptions the information are absolutley fantastic and spot on. Im running out the door right now, rucksack bulging, boots nik waxed ready to take on the world. I am walking from lands end to jon o groats starting in July. I have been trekking all over the world and aim to do the top twenty treks over the next couple of years all for charity. You should have a link to www.justgiving.com which gives people the oppurtunity to set up a templated easy website for all registerd UK charities. Great if your planning a walk/trek and want to do it for a charity of your choice (Im up there). It only takes ten mins. If there is anyway i can help i wouild love to write for you and happy to send you stuff. Thanyou Walkopedia your finger is on the pulse, your feet on the right trail. Walkers of the world unite indeed! Bill Peel
Walkopedia says: thank you so much Bill, this makes us remember why all the slog is worth it!
jack - Posted on: 27/05/2013
I find the obsession with ranking walks nonsensical. I like mountains. My friend likes desserts. And why would I care what anyone else likes? And your commentary section is peppered with people bitching about how there favourite walks should have been ranked higher. What a waste of time. I thought this would be a site I could make some use of and contribute to. It's just irritating.
carlos - Posted on: 14/05/2013
Is it really useful to rank the walks at all? Several comments have quibbled about why this walk is rated higher than that. Everyone has there own experiences and preferences. I keep seeing hikes described as difficult that seem casual to me. Any long hike will have ups, downs, and flats. Difficult just means worthwhile. And walks change over time with culture, politics, climate, trail traffic and such. I would like to see something prompting people to put the year and month they did a hike to help judge the relevance of the information. Also like to see the hikes searchable by length. Hikespeak.com does a good job of that.
Walkopedia says: thank you.The rating system is meant to be fun (and is based on our criteria, which we believe many would agree with, rather than scientific. Difficulty is intended to be aimed at a reasonably fit but not manically superfit walker, and this obviously won't work for the very keen or the couch potato or the very old or very young.... Dating when a walk was loaded or updated is a good idea, which we will instigate in due course.
DeAun - Posted on: 03/03/2013
I'd *really* like to see the option to save a walking wish list. If it's here I haven't been able to find it. Walkopedia says: thiank you - this is a lovely idea, and one of our long-term goals: only lack of time and funds are holding us back!! 
Brett - Posted on: 27/02/2013
Zanskar is 4,900 so should be deducted 6 points - instead only 3 is 'awarded'.
Padakun - Posted on: 17/08/2012
Walkers will want to check my new book, "Walk Like A Mountain: The Handbook of Buddhist Walking Practice". This is the first-ever book that examineswalking as a spiritual practice and provides detailed information on 12plus practices from all over the world. It will be available at fine book outlets everywhere in October 2012. For an advance read of the table of Contents and Preface, visit http://www.realperson.com/TendaiCanada/padakun/walk-like-a-mountain-home.htm I'd love to hear from other "spiritual" walkers, Innen (Rev. Innen Ray Parchelo,Director,Tendai Canada)
micky - Posted on: 17/08/2011
Dear All My Opinion is that if you dont have a Scottish walk in the top 100 then you must be a Racialist Regards Michael Dennett Alexandria Scotland
 
Walkopedia says: Worry not - they are coming! The Cairngorms, West Highland Way and Skye are all in the running for our Top 100, and more to follow!
 
 

Hello, what a wonderful site. I had never heard of it and stumbled on it while looking for information on the Landmannalaugar to Thorsmork trek in Iceland. I was therefore very surprised not to find it in your TOP100 or even in the total list. I've never walked the trek so cannot comment, but many seem to think that, although quite strenuous and subject to variable weather conditions, it is well worth the effort. Warmest Regards
 
Walkopedia says: THANK you- now firmly under consideration! We'd love to get your walk comments and / or pics if you do manage to go! We know a wonderful guide, too...
Liz Parker - Posted on: 19/12/2010
The Glacier Point picture under the Glacier National Park photos is actually Glacier Point in Yosemite national Park.
 
Walkopedia says:  Appreciated - THANKS!
Greg Locock - Posted on: 20/10/2010
I'd nominate Mt Feathertop Victoria, Oz, up from Harrietville via Bungalow Spur and out along the Ridgeback. An easy overnighter, excellent views of some of the High Country
pifawood - Posted on: 25/10/2009
your ranking system is good, but still too subjective. having done some of the walks there are glaring mistakes, the Overland track in Australia is streets ahead of Jabel Toubkal in Morocco ( which is 7 days of repetition)
 
Walkopedia say: THANK you for your comments, most helpful. Much comes down to the rating system: we believe that not to give marks for human interest would be an omision in reaching the perfect (or at lerast least bad) system. Jebel Toubkal loses out to the Overland on all counts except "human interest" - and, it is the fascinating glimpses into the Berber way of life that give it the edge, we think.  To be kept under review.
docdiamond - Posted on: 21/08/2009
I love your site, but the ranking is way out of whack. How can the Grand Canyon beat out the Tour du Mont Blanc? And so many of the highly ranked hikes are very obscure. Don't take this wrong, but you guys need to bring in some other folks to help with the ratings.
 
Walkopedia say: THANK you - comments like this are invaluable. It comes down to how one devises the best (or least bad??) rating system. Some people may feel they don't agree with our approach; their ideas for improvement would be vrey useful, as this is a long project. On our system, TMB suffers from the fact that there are lots of amazing mountains in the world, so it is not all that unique, despite being lovely. But there are few canyons (Fish River, Colca and Cotahuasi?) to rival the Grand one. Finally, we do plan to bring in interactive scoring, so the community can affect a walk's ranking - but, this is for the future....
tom - Posted on: 07/03/2009
A walk should be just that. There should be no need for equipment other than walking poles, and no need for skills other than putting one foot in front of the other. In other words, leave the climbs to the mountaineers. They have their Alpine clubs.
Ghostwriter - Posted on: 17/01/2009
What a great idea and a great site! A pity that New Zealand's walks do not rank more highly - after all, to the best of my knowledge, it's the only country which merits an entirely separate Lonely Planet dedicated to tramping and nothing else. But maybe I am being too partisan! I was surprised that you did not rate the Routeburn more highly since that is one of the best walks there. Also, there’s no sign of the Queen Charlotte Walkway, which is the one of the best ways to discover and enjoy the Marlborough Sounds – I would not rank it in the top tier but it’s worth a look if you visit NZ and can easily be done in sections. The Tongariro Crossing is one of the best one-day walks in the world, but I agree that the crowds can get a bit much in the summer. It’s better to go on a clear day in the winter or autumn.
HollandPeople - Posted on: 05/07/2008
(1) love your site (2) rating Kinabalu's difficulty as DIFFICULT, while Fuji and Stromboli as STRENUOUS is off the mark. I've climbed all 3 and can tell you Kinabalu's 7200' ascent then decent was particularly brutal. Especially with all those steps. The volcanoes allowed the climber to adjust his/her steps as needed with no particular shock to the quads on the way up or the joints or hams going down. All experiences were excellent.
Kinabalu with it's 7 vegetation zone beauty, Fuji with it's cultural dimension and sunrise and Stromboli with the very real threat of getting beaned by an errant projectile (3) not including Sentiero degli Dei (Path of the Gods) a 5 hr. hike linking Positano with Priano, along the Amalfi coast is a crime as is no mention of the Cinque Terre.
Thank you, Jim Holland
Mary. - Posted on: 22/06/2008
Hello Walkopedia and welcome - we need a site like you very much. I just wanted to recommend the Cinque Terre - a World Heritage "walk" which must rate up there very high. Check it out - plenty of websites - I just walked it in April, and it's FABULOUS - a lifetime highlight - and easy so lots of people could do it.

See our fun page (including travel writings) and our competitions.

Community Comments on Walks

The following walks have received comments from Walkopedia members:

Chilkoot Trail

Mt Bromo

Jebel Akhdar

Jebel Akhdar

Balcony Walk, Wadi Nakhur

Waitukubuli National Trail

Mare e Monti

Manaslu Circuit

Kumano Kodo

Markha Valley

Kungsleden

Nat Ma Taung (Mt Victoria)

Teton Crest Trail

Via Francigena

GR20

Picos de Europa

Samaria Gorge

Coast to Coast, Lake District

The Skeleton Coast

Cinque Terre

Burgess Highline Trail

Iceline Trail

Lake O'Hara

D-Day Beaches, Normandy

Aigues Tortes

Maroon Bells, Colorado

Western Ghats

Meteora

Imlil Area

Camino del Norte (Camino de Santiago alternative route)

Camino del Rey

Ava (Inwa)

Shipwreck Coast

Ruwenzori

Camino del Norte (Camino de Santiago alternative route)

Camino del Norte (Camino de Santiago alternative route)

Plitvice Lakes National Park

Mare e Monti

Ankarana NP

Walkers Haute Route (Chamonix to Zermatt)

Hadrian's Wall Path

Lycian Way

Rocky Mountain NP

Pyrenean Haute Route

Walkers Haute Route (Chamonix to Zermatt)

West Coast Trail

West Coast Trail

Bibbulmun Track

La Palma

Imlil Area

Katoomba to Mittagong

Jebel Toubkal Area

Bale Mountains

Philosopher's walk

Kumano Kodo

Mount Fuji

Banff NP: Lake Louise to Lake Agnes

Lycian Way

GR4 (Verdon Gorge)

Jebel Toubkal Ascent

Frenchman's Cap

Frenchman's Cap

St Olav's Way

Camino de Santiago

The Amalfi Coast

Lycian Way

St Paul Trail

South West Coast Path

Jebel Toubkal Circuit

Mt Everest Region

Pembrokeshire Coast Path

St-Gilles Way or Regordane

Villarrica Traverse

Huayhuash Circuit

Zion Narrows

Mt Yarigatake Area

Mt Everest Base Camp

Everest Base Camp

Ausangate Trek

Huayhuash Circuit

Kalaw-Inle Area

Kalaw to Inle Lake

Simien Mountains

Himalayan Far North

Druk Path

Tiger's Nest

The Skeleton Coast

Lofoten Islands

Jebel Toubkal Circuit

East Coast Trail

East Coast Trail

Californian Redwoods

Shikoku Pilgrimage

Brenta Dolomites

Cinque Terre

Kalaw-Inle Area

Kalaw to Inle Lake

Pyreneean High Route

North Drakensberg Traverse

Scarborough to Sorrento Quays

Appalachian Trail

Rupit to Besalu, Hills of Girona

Mont Blanc Area

Aiguilles Rouges

The Pilgrim's Trail, Mont St. Michel

Pembrokeshire Coast Path

Cinque Terre

GR5 or Grand Traverse des Alpes

Jesus Trail

Jesus Trail

Cinque Terre

St Paul Trail

Garibaldi Provincial Park

Manaslu Circuit

Manaslu Circuit

Lac Blanc and Southern Aiguilles Rouges Traverses

Great Ocean Walk

Camino Portugues

Camino de Santiago

Philosopher's walk

Mount Kailash Kora

Lawrence's Spring

Everest Base Camp

Southern Drakensbergs (south of GFiant's Castle)

West Coast Trail

Kalalau Trail, Kauai

North Drakensberg Traverse

Wadi Rum

Ala Daglar

Durmitor NP

Las Canadas and El Tiede, Tenerife

Mount Olympus

Table Mountain

Huayhuash Circuit

Kungsleden

Mt Etna

Annapurna Circuit

Hadrian's Wall Path

Mount Snowdon

Beijing

West Highland Way

Coast to Coast

Classic Inca Trail

Classic Inca Trail

Classic Inca Trail

Overland Track

Robert Louis Stevenson Trail

Jebel Toubkal Circuit

To Goecha La

Green Lake

Lower Singalila Ridge

Ben Nevis

Ağri Daği / Mt Ararat

Via Francigena

Great Ocean Walk

Inca Path to Choquequirao

Choquequirao to Machu Picchu

Western Ghats

Mt Yarigatake Area

Andes to Amazon

Kungsleden

Great Ocean Walk

Wilsons Promontory Southern Circuit

GR4 (Verdon Gorge)

Coast to Coast

Mount Kailash Kora

Manaslu Circuit

Wonchi Crater Lake

Camino de Santiago

Thames Path

The Ridgeway

Via Francigena

Everest Base Camp

Coast to Coast

Coast to Coast

Lebanon Mountain Trail

Mt Kilimanjaro

Great South West Walk

To the Valley of the Kings

Tongariro Northern Circuit

GR5 or Grand Traverse des Alpes

Mount Kenya

GR20

Via Francigena

Annapurna Massif

Lofoten Islands

Roraima

Stubai Hohenweg

Hallasan

Hadrian's Wall Path

Everest Base Camp

Overland Track

Milford Track

Alta Via No. 1

South Coast Track

Wilsons Promontory Southern Circuit

Overland Track

South West Coast Path

Hadrian's Wall Path

Overland Track

Annapurna Sanctuary

Mt Meru

Tour of Mt Blanc

Coast to Coast

Ridgeway

Everest Base Camp

Oxford Kora (Martin's Trail)

Mount Kailash Kora

Kangchenjunga/Singalila

Jokulsa Canyon National Park

Click here to add your ideas or comments on a walk

Roll of Honour: notable contributors

Dick Everard

Dick Everard is 69 years old and a retired civil engineer who spent a considerable part of his career working overseas. Being brought up on a farm, he has always spent as much time as possible outdoors and beside walking enjoys trout and salmon fishing and game shooting. He now works part time helping out on a small game shoot. Dick has walked the GR20 in Corsica; the GR5 in France; the TMB in France, Switzerland and Italy; the Haute Route Pyrenees, in France and Spain; the Walker’s Haute Route in France and Switzerland; the Manaslu Circuit in Nepal in addition to various walks in England, Scotland, Gran Canaria and Oman.

David Briese


See his Phototdiary of a Nomad. Beautiful photos and interesting descriptions of his walks. he has inspired us, and kindly lent us pictures and more. He is inspiring and a walking hero!

http://www.gang-gang.net/nomad/
Jim Holland

Jim has pointed us toward some very special walks in Italy - the wonderful Sentiero degli Dei snd the Cinque Terre - and given us some great photos!

Reggie Heyworth


Champion walker: irritating near high passes, when he draws inexorably ahead of the field. He has accompanied and entertained Walkopedia at Mt Kailash, in the Atlas, Bhutan and the Pindos, to name just 4. Having worked in Tanzania for many years, he devised the ultimate walking expedition there.

Jan Dudeck


Created the Greater Patagonia Trail, a huge concept and huge achievement.

https://www.walkopedia.net/walks/display-walk.asp?WalkID=2346&WalkName=Greater%20Patagonian%20Trail
Richard Long


One of the world's most interesting artists, he has made conceptual art involving extraordinary walking since the 1960s.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Long_(artist)

 


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