Freycinet Peninsula

  • Wine Glass Bay From Lookout - © William Mackesy
  • Oyster Bay Side - © William Mackesy
  • Across to Freycinet - © William Mackesy
  • Across to Freycinet 2 - © William Mackesy
  • Wallaby, Wine Glass Bay - © William Mackesy
  • Wine Glass Bay - © William Mackesy
  • Wine Glass Bay 2 - © William Mackesy

Key information: Freycinet Peninsula

    • Spectacular peninsula on Tasmania's east coast, with a thousand foot rocky spine of orange granite, outstanding beaches and coves, and the usual fascinating wildlife and vegetation.
      • Pretty crowded on short paths and en route for Wineglass Bay, but you can get away.
        • ANYONE GOT ANY GOOD PHOTOS? WE WOULD BE DELIGHTED TO POST THEM!

Walkopedia rating

  • Walkopedia rating84
  • Beauty34
  • Natural interest16
  • Human interest2
  • Charisma32
  • Negative points0
  • Total rating84

Vital Statistics

  • Length: Variable
  • Maximum Altitude: 300m(ish)
  • Level of Difficulty: Variable
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Oyster Bay Side - © William Mackesy

WALK SUMMARY

The Freycinet Peninsula, which protrudes southward from Tasmania's eastern coast, is rugged and lovely. With the 300m orange granite Hazards as its backbone, a sparkling and sometimes turquoise sea, some lovely beaches and coves on both sides and the usual fascinating wildlife, this peninsula provides some great walking. It is also a perfect walking counterpoint to the Overland Track.

This National Park boasts varied woodlands, heath and some marsh, as well as crag, cliff and beach, and many birds (sea-eagles, cockatoos and honeyeaters as well as gulls).

The area was home for 20,000 years or more to the aboriginal Oyster Bay Tribe, who have left their shell middens. Conflict with Europeans ended with the infamous Freycinet Line of 1831, when settlers lined up across the territory to hunt out the remaining Aborigines.

There is a wide range of places to stay and eat, around Coles Bay near the park entrance.

    • The Saffire Freycinet (www.saffire-freycinet.co.au) is top of the range, a superb place to luxuriate after some hard walking. Organises some excellent expeditions, too. Great food.
    • We ended up staying at, and liked, a 2 bedroom cottage at Eagle Peaks (www.eaglepeaks.co.au).

Large visitor numbers mean crowds, concreted steps and railings on the trail to Wineglass Bay lookout and down to the bay. Once you go further, though, the place empties out.

Here are some of the walks available:

    • Peninsula Track (or Circuit): a two day, 27km, trail around the wild and varied coast, taking in the two best beaches as well as the high ridge of the southern part of the peninsula, where the biggest views in the area can be viewed from 620m Mount Graham. Camp at Cook's Beach in the south-west.
    • Wineglass Bay Lookout / Wineglass Bay: there are too many people on the concreted 30 minute climb to the lookout, with its fine views, and the near end of the huge, marvellous, curved beach that is Wineglass Bay, some 20 minutes onwards. But once further down the beach and across the shady Isthmus Track to Hazards Beach inside the huge Great Oyster Bay and along the internal hillsides back to the car park, you will escape the crowds - well, most of them.
    • The Freycinet Experience is a four-day series of guided day walks to turn about the secluded friendly Beaches Lodge, said to get you to the best hills and coves of the Peninsula. (See www.freycinet.com.au for further information.) Very expensive.
    • Mt Amos is a three-hour trudge up the nearest Hazard to Wineglass Bay, wonderful views from its 300m summit.

See our Tasmania page for further detailed information. Lonely Planet's Walking in Australia is good for this area.

THIS PAGE IS AT AN EARLY STAGE OF DEVELOPMENT. PLEASE HELP US BY MAKING SUGGESTIONS AND SENDING PHOTOS! THANK YOU!

Other accounts: share your experiences

Your comments on this walk, your experiences and suggestions, and your photos are very welcome. Where appropriate, you will be credited for your contribution.

Across to Freycinet 2 - ©William Mackesy

Safety and problems: All walks have inherent risks and potential problems, and many of the walks featured on this website involve significant risks, dangers and problems. Problems of any sort can arise on any walk. This website does not purport to identify any (or all) actual or potential risks, dangers and problems that may relate to any particular walk.

Any person who is considering undertaking this walk should do careful research and make their own assessment of the risks, dangers and possible problems involved. They should also go to “Important information” for further important information.

Anyone planning an expedition to this place should see further important information about this walk.

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Wallaby, Wine Glass Bay - ©William Mackesy...
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