Pineta Valley

Key information: Pineta Valley

  • This lovely and very different valley runs deep into the high Pyreneean ridge, close to great Monte Perdido. It hosts a selection of exciting walking.

Walkopedia rating

  • Walkopedia rating86
  • Beauty33
  • Natural interest16
  • Human interest5
  • Charisma32
  • Negative points0
  • Total rating86

Vital Statistics

  • Length: Your choice
  • Maximum Altitude: 3,355m
  • Level of Difficulty: Variable

This walk description page is at an early stage of development, and will be expanded over time. Your comments on this walk, your experiences and tips, and your photos are very welcome.

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WALK SUMMARY

The lovely and very different Pineta valley lies to the east of and technically outside the Ordesa/Monte Perpido NP [link], and runs north-west, right up to the north of great Monte Perdido, which it gets on for cutting off from the rest of the highlands, with the vast cliffs and crags of the high border ridge immediately to its north. It is wider than its neighbouring canyons but with huge crags to its north, the border-ridge with France. Glacier-carved, it still retains some ice-cliffs in the face of Monte Perdido.

You can approach the valley by road from the east, driving up from Biesla to the Parador (no less) de Monte Perdido in the outstandingly but harshly beautiful head-basin of the main valley. 1,000m above to the west and right under Monte Perdido is the spectacular upper valley known as the Balcon de Pineta.

The valley has a fine selection of walks, including:

In and above the Balcon de Pineta, whence you can climb Monte Perdido (3,355m – a  huge walk if not via a night in the Góriz refuge).

The tough ascent to Lago de Marbore is said to be superb (11km); as is the Llanos de la Larri side-valley to the north.

You can cross to the Góriz refuge and the Ordesa and Aňisclo canyons to the west.

Or even cross due north into the superb Cirque d’Estaubé in France, and thence via a high col to Gavarnie.

Between Pineta and Aňisclo to the west is the extraordinarily narrow and deep almost-slot canyon of Escuaín, much less visited but with some giddy party on its upper flanks.

We want to give more: Please help us by making suggestions and sending photos! Thank you!

For more information and photos, including on wildlife and the landscape and including detailed practical information and some warnings, see our Spanish Pyrenees walk page.

Other accounts: share your experiences

Your comments on this walk, your experiences and suggestions, and your photos are very welcome. Where appropriate, you will be credited for your contribution.

Safety and problems: All walks have inherent risks and potential problems, and many of the walks featured on this website involve significant risks, dangers and problems. Problems of any sort can arise on any walk. This website does not purport to identify any (or all) actual or potential risks, dangers and problems that may relate to any particular walk.

Any person who is considering undertaking this walk should do careful research and make their own assessment of the risks, dangers and possible problems involved. They should also go to “Important information” for further important information.

Anyone planning an expedition to this place should see further important information about this walk.

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