Capu Rossu

  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy

Key information: Capu Rossu

    A magnificent promontory topped out by a Genoese lookout tower at 331m.

Walkopedia rating

  • Walkopedia rating89
  • Beauty33
  • Natural interest15
  • Human interest8
  • Charisma33
  • Negative points0
  • Total rating89

Vital Statistics

  • Length: 6+km
  • 3.5 hrs
  • Level of Difficulty: Strenuous
Top
© William Mackesy

WALK SUMMARY

This magnificent promontory is the Corsican mainland’s westernmost point and is topped out by a Genoese lookout tower at 331m. The walk out to the tower and back is quite demanding, with around 530m of ascent and descent. Given its exposed position, it is best not to walk here in storms or high winds.

The first half of the outward leg descend steadily to an old shepherd’s hut, with fine views along the rocky high ridge of the headland to the ever-present tower, and south down the bays and headlands of the west coast towards Cargese. The maquis is at all time beautiful, varied, vivid and sparkling with flowers when Walkopedia was there.

Then it is a tough climb, much on bare red granite, some up a cleft in the cliffs into which a beautifully restored switchback path has been crammed, to the high end of the promontory and the Turghiu tower – and to gasp-inducing views, not least when you lie at the northern edge to gaze 1,000 sheer feet down into the sea. Back inland, the broken cliffs run into the Porto bay, with high ridges behind topped out by the shapely cone of Monte Cinto, Corsica’s highest peak. The views north and south up and down the coast are as beautiful as you could hope.

The tower is fascinating, one big chamber with a flat roof above, all beautifully restored.

The return journey is also to be savoured: while you have seen it all before, the pleasures are often new.

See William Mackesy’s account [link to account in Corsica page] of him walking this route as part of a ‘perfect walking week’.

Note: beware of notorious summer thunderstorms, get away from risk areas if one approaches.

Key book: Cicerone’s Walking in CorsicaFind these and other books on Amazon.

SEE OUR CORSICA PAGE FOR DETAILED GENERAL AND PRACTICAL INFORMATION.

Other accounts: share your experiences

Your comments on this walk, your experiences and suggestions, and your photos are very welcome. Where appropriate, you will be credited for your contribution.

© William Mackesy

Safety and problems: All walks have inherent risks and potential problems, and many of the walks featured on this website involve significant risks, dangers and problems. Problems of any sort can arise on any walk. This website does not purport to identify any (or all) actual or potential risks, dangers and problems that may relate to any particular walk.

Any person who is considering undertaking this walk should do careful research and make their own assessment of the risks, dangers and possible problems involved. They should also go to “Important information” for further important information.

Anyone planning an expedition to this place should see further important information about this walk.

Top
© William Mackesy...
Top

Responsible travel matters, a lot. How you travel will make a real difference - for better or worse. PLEASE consider this when making plans. Read more

Our partners Responsible Travel 

have carefully chosen expeditions 

and holidays around the world.    

Great walking, and much else...

Walkopedia Sponsor

See their site for inspiring ideas.

For £100 off your trip, contact them quoting WW50

All material on this website is © Walkopedia Ltd 2008 - 2015, unless specified otherwise.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED