Femes area

  • Ridge south of Femes - © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • Across Femes from the south, Atalaya behind - © William Mackesy
  • From south ridge picnic spot - © William Mackesy
  • South ridge - © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • Looking north back to the southern ridge from Lomo de Pozo - © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • West from Lomo del Pozo - © William Mackesy
  • Barranco de los Disos - © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • Pico Redondo - © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • Looking west - © William Mackesy
  • Southish down Brranco de la Higuera - © William Mackesy
  • Traversing peak beyong goat farm - © William Mackesy

Key information: Femes area

  • Some really good walking in the group of hills around Femés in the south-west of Lanzarote. 

Walkopedia rating

  • Walkopedia rating81
  • Beauty30
  • Natural interest15
  • Human interest6
  • Charisma30
  • Negative points0
  • Total rating81

Vital Statistics

  • Length: Your choice
  • Maximum Altitude: 611m
  • Level of Difficulty: Variable
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West from Lomo del Pozo - © William Mackesy

WALK SUMMARY

The group of hills around the pleasant-enough village of Femés in the south-west has some really good walking. There are two ridges and their outliers to choose from, basically north and south of the village. Both drop away steeply on the outside of the massif, with some particularly fine, empty, ridges and valleys sinking to the sea to the south-east. This is drier country than further north. 

The best walk appears to be the 7.5km circuit around the hills and barrancos to the south

This starts out up a dreary track to some dreary ridge-top buildings which turn out to be a rather smelly goat farm.  The walk becomes magnificent immediately after, traversing on a path cut into the cliffs below a peak, high above the deep, quiet grey-green Barranco de la Higuera. At its base is the sea and nowt else - this rough area has been spared development, so the view is empty (well, almost) of signs of the modern world, and welcome for that. 

At a col, a huge view opens up, westward over the empty desert of the Rubicon Plain to the coastal whiteness of Playa Blanca. The trail then passes delightfully ascos the cliffs below Pico Redondo to the Degollada del Portugues pass, where it picks up south-eastern views again. A ridge walk takes a very happy you down for a km or so, then you turn left and drop easily into the Barranco de la Casita, climbing back up to the Lomo de Pozo ridge. It would be rude not to divert rightward along the ridge for a few hundred metres to the eponymous hilltop for lovely views all round. 

Then it is the long trudge and then slog up the western flank of the Barranco de la Higuera to the ridgetop goat farm. We recommend that, rather than drop straight back to Femés, you divert east along the lovely ridge south of Femés (see below) for superb views down to the sea and back over the Femés valley. Walkopedia ate a very happy picnic here. 

The ambitious could, rather than returning up the Barranco de la Higuera to the ridgetop above Femés, head down the barranco and turn north up a PR trail which would eventually lead to Casitas de Femés – but climbing onto the gorgeous ridge immediately south of Femés (see below) and thus returning to Femés; there are two options to get onto the ridge - a steep one straight up a side ridge to Pico Oveja, or a gentler one which starts from much nearer Casitas.

Atalaya de Femés, the large ex-volcano immediately above the village to the north, looks frankly dull, not helped by being topped by a hideous communications station, although it has admittedly outstanding views of the south of the island, from Timafaya to the north to the south-west  tip. A slog straight up and down from the village. The long ridge walk to it from Yaiza/Uga to the north-east is a lot more appealing, with a longer, gentler, more varied approach.

The lovely level ridge immediately south of Femés, towards Pico Cuervos and Pico Flores looks very inviting – and is delightful, easy walking with superb views down to the sea and back over the Femés valley. 

This is strenuous walking in dry mountains. Come fully prepared, including carrying enough water.

Lanzarote– Sunflower guides: 31 varied walks, including most of these. Recommended. Find relevant books on Amazon.

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Southish down Brranco de la Higuera - © William Mackesy

Safety and problems: All walks have inherent risks and potential problems, and many of the walks featured on this website involve significant risks, dangers and problems. Problems of any sort can arise on any walk. This website does not purport to identify any (or all) actual or potential risks, dangers and problems that may relate to any particular walk.

Any person who is considering undertaking this walk should do careful research and make their own assessment of the risks, dangers and possible problems involved. They should also go to “Important information” for further important information.

Anyone planning an expedition to this place should see further important information about this walk.

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From south ridge picnic spot - © William Mackesy...
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