Above Grenville

  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy
  • © William Mackesy

Key information: Above Grenville

  • Another fascinating walk, in one of Grenada's long-abandoned plantations.
  • A fine old graded track takes you up through the remains of the plantation, passing the ruins of the plantation buildings, which are interesting but unlovely, and redolent of the miseries of the slaves who worked them. 

Walkopedia rating

  • Walkopedia rating87
  • Beauty29
  • Natural interest13
  • Human interest14
  • Charisma31
  • Negative points0
  • Total rating87

Vital Statistics

  • Length: 2+ hrs
  • Maximum Altitude: n/a
  • Level of Difficulty: Moderate
Top
© William Mackesy

WALK SUMMARY

Grenada's history, like so much of the Caribbean, is painfully  interwoven with colonialism and slavery. Sugar was the crop which made it valuable to the colonialists, its intensive production of course made feasible by slavery. Huge swathes of the old plantations are long-abandoned, and have returned to secondary forest, in which you can pick cocoa, nutmeg and mangoes (we have feasted on ripe fallen mangoes- some bush tucker!)

They are now charming, fascinating, atmospheric jumbles of trees and scrub, the old trees and the plantation structures much in evidence including the fine old graded tracks which lace the hillsides. You will meet the melancholy remains of chunkily built plantation buildings as you walk. They are stark reminders of the human misery which underpinned this economy.  

Above Grenville: You start with a potter around Grenville's busy and engaging streets, out to where the minibuses sit. 10 mins or so up the hill, you climb out at a junction and cross a stream that is the island's biggest river, joining a lane lined by colourful cottages in their luxuriant gardens. 

You are soon on a wide, graded grassy track, typical of the former access tracks which lace the old plantation hillsides. You walk through lovely secondary forest, the old plantation nutmeg, cocoa and mango trees now fighting to compete with self-seeded trees and scrub.  

The track gradually climbs a ridge, then traverses the hillside, with wide views across the forest tops to the sea.

Coming back down, you will see the heavy ruins of the plantation  buildings. Further down, you reach a low stone bridge over our stream. A minute upstream is a perfect little bathing spot under the shady greenery.

Past a vast and huge-rooted survivor of the hurricanes of the years, the track reaches the outskirts of town. 

Have a look at TripAdvisor – there are tens of millions of reviews, so you may get good, current views on guides, places to hike and places to stay here.

For more information and photos, including detailed practical information and some warnings, see our Grenada walk page.

WILLIAM MACKESY'S ACCOUNT
of this walk

We started with a potter around Grenville's busy and engaging streets, out to where the minibuses sat. We piled into the back of a hot and cheerful banger, and wound our way for 10 mins or so up the hill and out to the forested edge of town.

We climb out at a junction and cross a stream that is the island's bigest river, which clearly goes mad in spate. We are immediately on a lane lined by colourful cottages in their luxuriant gardens, opening nutmeg and sniffing at its red mace lining, and sucking on the sweet, lychee like outer pulp of cocoa seeds. 

We are.....

READ MORE

Other accounts: share your experiences

Your comments on this walk, your experiences and suggestions, and your photos are very welcome. Where appropriate, you will be credited for your contribution.

© William Mackesy

Safety and problems: All walks have inherent risks and potential problems, and many of the walks featured on this website involve significant risks, dangers and problems. Problems of any sort can arise on any walk. This website does not purport to identify any (or all) actual or potential risks, dangers and problems that may relate to any particular walk.

Any person who is considering undertaking this walk should do careful research and make their own assessment of the risks, dangers and possible problems involved. They should also go to “Important information” for further important information.

Anyone planning an expedition to this place should see further important information about this walk.

Top
© William Mackesy...
Top

Responsible travel matters, a lot. How you travel will make a real difference - for better or worse. PLEASE consider this when making plans. Read more

Our partners Responsible Travel 

have carefully chosen expeditions 

and holidays around the world.    

Great walking, and much else...

Walkopedia Sponsor

See their site for inspiring ideas.

For £100 off your trip, contact them quoting WW50

All material on this website is © Walkopedia Ltd 2008 - 2015, unless specified otherwise.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED